Teach & Serve II, No. 6 – Right Place at the Right Time

Teach & Serve II, No. 6 – Right Place at the Right Time

September 14, 2016

I just don’t know what having a 3.75 or a 4.00 does for you? Will it potentially get you into a better school? Sure it will. Potentially. Will it get you a scholarship? Same answer. Potentially. Should you work hard because, well, we all should work hard? Of course you should. But what does having a high GPA really do for you?

Are you going to see Sully, the movie about the Miracle on the Hudson? I recommend it for all kinds of reasons: good direction, good acting, great message.

When you are a high school teacher or administrator, you tend to inherit things and I’m not talking about fun things like antiques or bequests. No, I am talking about duties. I am talking about inheriting duties.

When I reminisce about the various duties I took on over the course of my twenty-plus years working in high schools, I cannot remember how I received most of them. Usually they were delegated. Sometimes I volunteered. Often I was in the right (or wrong) place at the right (or wrong) time.

One duty (and, no, I cannot remember how it fell to me) that I thought I would not enjoy that I ended up loving was delivering a brief speech at our Underclasswomen Honors Assembly. My role was not, strictly speaking, directly involved with students. I was an assistant principal for faculty and curriculum. However, I was never one to turn down giving a speech. I’m still not one to do so…

The idea behind the speech was to share some words with the underclasswomen about what academic achievement meant. It’s important to note that the girls receiving the awards and the girls who did not qualify for the awards were in attendance at this assembly. So, yeah, if I did not want to make anyone feel bad (and I am thinking of the girls who worked really, really hard to make honor roll and just missed the cut here, not the ones who really did not care about the thing), I needed to tread lightly or with some modicum of awareness at least.

I hit on a through-line almost immediately. I told the girls “I don’t really know what receiving these GPA awards means. I’ve been teaching a long time, and I am not sure if getting them is a function of hard work – I am sure that is part of it – or the particular teachers you have – I am sure, too, that’s a part of it – or sheer luck – yes, that’s a part of it as well. I just don’t know what having a 3.75 or a 4.00 does for you? Will it potentially get you into a better school? Sure it will. Potentially. Will it get you a scholarship? Same answer. Potentially. Should you work hard because, well, we all should work hard? Of course you should. But what does having a high GPA really do for you?”

Here I paused as though I really did not think having a high GPA is that important – spoiler alert: I think it is important.

“You know,” I continued, “there’s this guy. Captain Sully. Have you heard of him?”

sullyThis first time I gave this speech was in the spring of 2009. The “Miracle on the Hudson” had happened in January that year. Many of the girls did not know to what I was referring which worked just fine for my purposes.

“Did you hear about the plane crash and the captain who saved all the passengers and crew on his flight by landing his plane on the Hudson River in New York City? How does something like that happen? How does this guy know he can’t get back to an airport, know what’s going on on his plane? Know he can land on a river?”

I asked them to imagine the scene. I asked them to imagine the man. I paused again.
“Began to fly when he was a teenager. Won numerous civic awards. Near the top of his class in high school. Numerous commendations at the Air Force Academy.  Top of his class as best flyer at the Air Force Academy. Incredible work ethic. Incredible dedication. Incredible feat to save 155 lives. Maybe this kind of stuff does matter.”

I paused one last time.

“Captain Sullenberger was in the right place at the right time with the right background. If he hadn’t prepared his life as he had, the Miracle on the Hudson may never have happened. What’s in store for you?”

That was it.

I think it was enough.

Right place. Right prep. Right time.