EduQuote of the Week: October 9 – 15, 2017

Newspaper Week

A newspaper is a public trust, and we will suffer as a society without them.

– Michael Moore

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EduQuote of the Week: February 27 – March 5, 2017

Diversity is not about how we differ. Diversity is about embracing one another’s uniqueness.

Ola Joseph

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EduQuote of the Week: February 20 – 26, 2017

“Take off your bedroom slippers. Put on your marching shoes,” he said, his voice rising as applause and cheers mounted. “Shake it off. Stop complainin’. Stop grumblin’. Stop cryin’.” We are going to press on. We have work to do.

President Barack Obama

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EduQuote of the Week: February 13 – 19, 2017

Hate is too great a burden to bear. It injures the hater more than it injures the hated.

Coretta Scott King

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EduQuote of the Week: February 6 – 12, 2017

Have a vision. Be demanding.

General Colin Powell

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Teach & Serve No. 32 – Emboldened by the Homilies, Embarrassed in the Hallways

Teach & Serve 

No. 32 * March 23, 2016


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Emboldened by the Homilies, Embarrassed in the Hallways

… when we’re challenged to alter our course, we’re not talking about the simple things… we’re talking about significant changes, sea changes.

… starting soft and slow, like a small earthquake and when he lets go, half the valley shakes …

Neil Diamond, Brother Love’s Travelling Salvation Show

There’s little like the feeling of hearing a good homily or listening intently to a sermon or sharing that touches the heart and the mind. There’s a certain energy I feel when I’ve heard a terrific reflection – an energy that enlivens and emboldens. Like many people, I have been touched by homilies when I am at mass and other religious services be these homilies given by priests or deacons or lay women or men. I have heard words that have inspired, challenged and moved me and have left liturgies inspired to talk, to change and to do.

Likewise, I have gone to thousands of hours of workshops on teaching and administration, have heard from educators at professional development opportunities –  conferences and the like – and have embraced the messages they’ve given. Leaving these PD opportunities I have walked away ready to change my teaching or my leadership. I have been motivated to be a better educator by what I have seen, what I have heard and the passion with which the message was delivered.

Brother LoveInevitably, following these experiences, I head back to my life – to my desk or to my classroom – considering implementation of what I have heard, of what I have learned. And, without always being conscious of this fact, I begin a certain calculus: if the changes I have been inspired to envision deal with me and me alone and if they don’t represent much risk, they have a pretty good chance of happening. If they involve my relationships with others or require me bringing others on board for whatever change I am envisioning, they may well happen, but will take some work. If the changes are significant and will necessitate shifts in myself and others from ways we’re comfortable proceeding to ways we are not – ways that are new and different – then they chances they will occur fall. Tremendously.

So, personal easy changes I am willing to make. More challenging changes that involve others, I would like to make. Vast paradigm shifts for me and those around me, I am afraid to make.

Inspiration, where have you gone? Where was the boldness of the moment after the homily, during the applause at the conference, when I was writing my notes about a speech?

Let’s be honest: when were touched by someone’s words, when we’re challenged to alter our course, we’re not talking about the simple things, those things we can easily change in ourselves or ways in which we can quickly improve our environments at work, we’re talking about significant changes, sea changes.

It’s so much easier to smile about the homily and let it go. So many fewer feathers get ruffled when we say “yeah, I heard some really wonderful ideas at that conference last week” but we don’t really try to implement them. Our situations, personal and professional, seem somehow more secure when we’re not leading the call to action, the call to change.

I often feel emboldened by the homilies, but embarrassed in the hallways, as though my excitement over some message I’ve heard and want to share is somehow something of which to be ashamed, as if my interest in improvement and my desire to engage others on it is somehow silly.

For people who seek continual self-reflection and for institutions that are about perpetual self-renewal, embracing and preaching the message, singing the good news of who we are and what we can be is critically important.

Listen for what emboldens you, reach for what can improve you, search for that which will change your culture for the better. Don’t turn away from it. Don’t be embarrassed.

Be happy you heard the call.

It’s love, love Brother Love’s Travelling Salvation Show. Pack up the babies and grab the old ladies and everyone goes, ‘cause everyone knows about Brother Love’s show…

Neil Diamond, Brother Love’s Travelling Salvation Show

Teach & Serve No. 16 – The Networked Reality

Teach & Serve 

No. 16 * November 17, 2015


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


THE NETWORKED REALITY

We are not encumbered by any walls, much less the four walls of our schools…

In the course of my work, I have the opportunity to spend time with large groups of educators who periodically come together for cohort meetings at locations across the country. The organization for which I serve helps put these events on for professionals in our network to bring them together so they can share with one another, learn from one another and simply be together with one another. In Chicago, Illinois last week, I was with over 65 principals from schools in our network. This week, the technology directors and folks with similar jobs in our schools will be gathering in Omaha, Nebraska.

As a participant in prior gatherings like this, I found them to be engaging and refreshing – chances to be with like-minded people discussing topics of the day that could make a difference in the lives of students back at my school. As a coordinator of said events, it’s very interesting to stand back and watch these gatherings unfold. Because the conferences in our network feature folks from a maximum of 90 schools, the people who come to them frequently know one another. Certainly they are familiar with each other’s schools. They have a shared bond beyond the jobs they do, so settling in and getting comfortable with each other doesn’t take very long and then the gatherings can really take off.

What I’ve found most intriguing (and, some might say, most obvious given that what I am about to write isn’t any great insight) is how connected these people remain between our periodic get-togethers. Though most of the schools in our network are spread across North America with miles-and-miles in between them, these people have been in contact in “off” years. They’ve been collaborating and working together, advising one another and staying abreast of developments in each other’s schools.

NetworkThe reality of our work today is that we are not encumbered by the “four walls” of our schools. We can be connected to wherever we’d like, whenever we’d like to be. We can reach out for expertise beyond ourselves, find wisdom in other contexts, look to people who are not us to tell us who we are and who we can be.

This is not just something we ought to do for fun. This is not just some opportunity we might consider taking advantage of when everything else at our school is going well and in place. This is not simply an option in the 21st century. It’s an imperative.

The reality of being able to be networked with other educators around our cities, our states, our country and our world is a reality that matters. It matters to our students, for their worlds are not our worlds. Their worlds are not the worlds in which we grew up or in which we learned to teach. Their worlds are interconnected and immediate. And we have to push into those worlds with force.

The networked reality calls us to do this. We don’t need to wait to read monthly journal articles about best practices being implemented in inventive schools half a country away from us. We can be connected to that progress, right here, right now in real time. We can bring experts to us. We can be experts for one another. The networked reality challenges us to be current, to build online Professional Learning Networks and to access them. To follow trends on Twitter. To fill our news feed with articles to parse, stories to read, strategies to attempt. The network reality makes our professional world so much larger while simultaneously rendering it so small we can grasp it, access it and use it to the benefit of our students.

After all, isn’t that what we’re all about? Aren’t we about benefitting the kids? The best way to do that, in real time, is to get comfortable in the networked reality.

Get comfortable in it and get to work.