EduQuote of the Week: September 11 – 17, 2017

Day of Prayer and Remembrance

Even the smallest act of service, the simplest act of kindness, is a way to honor those we lost, a way to reclaim that spirit of unity that followed 9/11.

– President Obama

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Teach & Serve III, No. 5 – Embrace the Expectations of Leadership

Teach & Serve III, No. 5

Embrace the Expectations of Leadership

September 6, 2017

Give me leaders who understand this, leaders who know that the buck (and everything else) does stop with them. Give me leaders who say: “I get it. I will take it.”

Let us begin this blog with a statement which, I admit, may or may not be true: It is harder now than ever to lead a school.

Again, I admit, there may have been moments in the past, long before my blip on the timeline of the educational game, when school leaders and teachers had it harder than they do currently, but it sure seems like school leaders and teachers deal with an awful lot right now.

School leaders seem to be held accountable for so much. They are held accountable for school culture, for the manner in which their students use social media, for the behavior of the people on their staffs, for the content of the textbooks (digital or otherwise) used in their curricula, for graduation rates, for college and career placements for whether no not students get invited to other students’ parties, for what kids do after dances and proms, for how students might procure alcohol and other materials at school events, for… well, you get the picture.

While some of the above issues may appear more critical than others, please note this: I did not fabricate any of them. All of the above have been issues brought to me or to my colleagues in their work. And the list could be much, much, longer. Some of these issues are, obviously, realistic. They are the things school leaders can and should address. They are things that ought to be on the leader’s proverbial plate. Some of them, however, are unrealistic to the point of being absurd. And, yet, they find their way to the teacher or school leader’s door.

All of this kind of makes you wonder why someone would choose school leadership as a vocation. I cannot answer that musing. I can say this: great teachers and great school leaders embrace the expectations of their position. It is not that they love every moment, or that they agree with the fact that all of these issues (and more) should come to their office doors. No. It is that they understand that these issues – any issues which occur that involve their staffs, their students, their families – are part and parcel to their work. Great leaders do not avoid this kind of responsibility. They take it on. They lean into it. They embrace it.

Schools are complex structures. Those structures involve hundreds (or thousands) of people. Those people, whether they know it or not, rely on great leadership.

Give me leaders who understand this, leaders who know that the buck (and everything else) does stop with them. Give me leaders who say: “I get it. I will take it.”

Give me leaders who embrace the expectations, realistic or not, of those they lead.

EduQuote of the Week: September 4 – 10, 2017

Childhood Injury Prevention Week

Children learn what they live.

– Dorothy Nolte

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Teach & Serve III, No. 4 – Optimism Can Be a Choice… and It Should Be

Teach & Serve III, No. 4

Optimism Can Be a Choice… and It Should Be

August 30, 2017

Our work is with kids. Our work is for the future. What could be better – or inspire more optimism – than that?

 

We work with kids.

Let us never forget that we work with kids.

I know that seems like a ridiculous directive, remembering we work with kids, but in the midst of the booting up duties at the beginning of the school year, as we set up our LMS’s and our electronic grade books, as we go from meeting-to-meeting and review policies and procedures, the fact that we do all this to get to the good part – the working with kids part – can be lost in the haze.

We should not lose sight of this.

Whether we are teachers or administrators, our work is with students, with kids.

And kids are exciting and excitable. And they are young (at least they are younger than we are). And they are looking at us. All. The. Time.

It is all too easy at the start of the year to be weighed down by the pressure of the work, by the immensity of all the we needs must do and all that we are asked and directed to do. It is all too easy to set high goals for ourselves – and setting those high goals is, of course, critical! – but to see those goals as barriers to cross not benchmarks to achieve. It is all too easy to come into the year tired. Worn out. Pessimistic about the months ahead.

Guard against pessimism.

Remember, the students are watching us. All. The. Time.

In a society that rains pessimism down on them, would it not be refreshing – for them – if they did not receive the same from us? Would it not be wonderful for them to receive from us the reverse?

Optimism is a choice and choosing it over pessimism is a choice that we can and should make over-and-over again.

Our work is with kids. Our work is for the future. What could be better – or inspire more optimism – than that?

It is our choice to give into the morass of pessimism and our choice to embrace the freedom of optimism.

Which would you rather bring to your classroom and context this year?

EduQuote of the Week: August 28 – September 3, 2017

Kirby at 100

There are people that I didn’t like, but I saw them suffer and it changed me. I promised myself that I would never tell a lie, never hurt another human being, and I would try to make the world as positive as I could.

– Jack “King” Kirby

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Teach & Serve III, No. 3 – From Small Beginnings Come Great Things

Teach & Serve III, No. 3

From Small Beginnings Come Great Things

August 23, 2017

The beginning of school years is a time to think big, to dream big, to reach out and make goals and stare bravely into the limitless sky.

In Cleveland, OH in the mid 1930’s, two young men, sons of Jewish immigrants to the United States, dreamed they would collaborate on a newspaper comic strip that would be distributed far-and-wide, that would be popular and that would make them financially secure.

 

In Chicago, IL in the early 1970’s, a young woman found confidence in herself as she danced in the chorus of a production of West Side Story, found pride in herself listening to the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, jr and found strength to think big as she looked to the Space Race and dreamed of being an astronaut.

In Pakistan in the mid 2010’s, a young woman wanted something very simple: she wanted to learn and she wanted other girls like her to be able to learn as well. She dreamed of a country and a world that would support her, would shelter her and would teach her.

What are the dreams of the young people sitting in our classrooms as we begin this school year? What are the dreams the adults on our teaching staffs, in our faculty rooms and offices and in our classrooms have at the beginning of this year? What are the dreams that you have for your work at your school? What are your hopes? Your aspirations? Your desires?

The beginning of school years is a time to think big, to dream big, to reach out and make goals and stare bravely into the limitless sky. It is an exciting time to be an educational leader and, when we can rise above the detail work that goes into getting any new year off the ground, we ought to take the time to think about what we want to accomplish, what we want to do and what we want to become. We ought to take time to think about how we can nurture those around us, how we can foster their dreams, how we can empower.

The temptation might be to think too big, to bite off more than we can chew. It is the fall. We are excited. We are energized. We are thinking big!

Perhaps it is enough to know that the dreams that surround us, the sparks in our students and our colleagues, the impulses that arise in our communities – precisely at this time of year – may simply be seeds that, if fed and watered and encouraged, will eventually blossom into good and great things.

When Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster wrote and drew and drafted the character that eventually became Superman, they did not start with the idea fully formed. Rather they had a series of concepts, they discussed them, they encouraged each other. They made history.

When Mae Jamison developed her talent and unleashed her confidence, when she embraced the challenges she faced and grasped the stars becoming the first African American woman to go into space, she altered society’s perceptions. She made history.

When Malala Yousafzai advocated for her own education, she was beaten. Then she advocated for the education of all young women. She was tortured. Then she gained world-wide notoriety and her cause gained overwhelming support. She got her education. She got it for her sisters. She made history.

These ideas started small. They were dreams. They were personal.

They changed the world.

Imagine what might be happening in the minds and hearts of those with whom you work. Imagine the potential in your students and your colleagues especially right now, in these early stages of the school year. Imagine the collective small dreams that might break big if given the chance.

And give that chance. Give every chance.

Help change the world.

After all, that is our business in education, is it not?

EduQuote of the Week: August 21 – 27, 2017

Safe at Home Week

Those who make conversations impossible, make escalation inevitable.

– Stefan Molyneux

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Teach & Serve III, No. 2 – Playlist 2017-2018

Teach & Serve III, No. 2

Playlist 2017-2018

August 16, 2017

… time to put together the mixtape that will be the soundtrack for the upcoming nine months, the backbeat of the days and weeks and months ahead.

It’s that time of year again: time to put together the mixtape that will be the soundtrack for the upcoming nine months, the backbeat of the days and weeks and months ahead.

In Teach & Serve Volume I a couple years back, I wrote about #OneSong, stealing the idea from my good friend and esteemed educator Sean Gaillard. The playlist is more than one song… it’s a concept album for an entire school year.

How do songs make my playlist? They land there for one of two reasons.

First, I like how they make me feel. In the fall as the year begins, I am searching for energy, excitement and enthusiasm. You won’t find too many ballads on the playlist, but you may find some instrumentals.

Second, the lyrics resonate with me, move me, inspire me and send me a message.

I listen to the playlist all year, adding to it, deleting from, adapting it like any good teacher should do.

Here’s this year’s edition:

What are you listening to this fall?

EduQuote of the Week: August 14 – 20, 2017

Do everything possible so that liberty is victorious over oppression, justice over injustice, love over hate.

– Ignacio Ellacuira, SJ

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EduQuote of the Week: August 7 – 13, 2017

National Smile Week

Let us always meet each other with smile, for the smile is the beginning of love.

– Saint Teresa of Calcutta

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