EduQuote of the Week: April 11 – 19, 2016

door quotes

If someone is going down the wrong road, they don’t need motivation to speed up. What they needs is education to turn around.

– Jim Rohn

 

EduQuote of the Week: December 14 – January 4, 2016

door quotesLet go of your hate. – Luke Skywalker

Teach & Serve No. 19 – Your All-Star Cast

Teach & Serve 

No. 19 * December 8, 2015


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


YOUR ALL-STAR CAST

We’ve experienced groups clashing painfully and failing. What’s the difference? How does a cast go from a cast to an all-star cast?

As I sat at my computer this weekend wrapping up a few work projects that had spilled over into Saturday, my Facebook Messenger chime went off and I was delighted to spend a few moments in virtual conversation with my old friend Sean Gaillard who is the talented and well respected principal of John F. Kennedy High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Blog post after blog post have been written extoling the importance and potential of robust Professional Learning Networks that can be built online and I am very happy to say that Sean has led the way for me getting my head around this concept. He leads by example here, connecting himself with teachers and administrators all over the country. He’s had played a significant role in pioneering Twitter movements such as #Read4Fun and #CelebrateMonday along with moderating online chats and professional development. He’s absolutely a guru of this stuff and I am always happy to have a chance to learn from him.

Given that, do you know what we talked about?

The cast of the 1970s miniseries Centennial, of course.

CentennialPeople of a certain age remember miniseries. If you’re too young, think of them as Netflix or Amazon dropping 10 – 13 episodes of a complete season of a show and you moderating your binge watching to three episodes a night. Does that ring bells for anyone out there? Do you remember Centennial?

We got on the topic because we were exchanging addresses for our Christmas card lists and I informed my old friend that I live in Centennial, Colorado. From there, it was rapid-fire word association playing on the author (James Michener), the miniseries and the novel. Sean even dug up and sent me a picture of his tattered copy!

As we talked about the miniseries, we began to run down the actors we remembered from the cast. As you may recall (again, if you of a certain age), it was a pretty amazing cast. Richard Chamberlain, Robert Conrad, Sally Kellerman, Raymond Burr, Timothy Dalton, Richard Crenna… need I go on? One could say it was an all-star cast.

As Sean and I wrapped up our chat, it occurred to me that what good leaders – like Sean – do is create all-star casts around them. Good leaders put people in positions to work together in cooperation. Good leaders empower people to combine their strengths, to deemphasize their weaknesses and to work towards shared and clearly articulated goals.

I don’t want to open up an extended sports metaphor here (though it might be apt to do so) and I don’t need to because sports teams are not the only teams many of us have experience of in our lives. Whether we played a sport in school or not, we’ve been put on teams: teams to do projects, teams to choose textbooks, learning teams to plan curriculum. Teams. Teams. Teams. (Okay, yes, you could read the last three words as a Hoosiers paraphrase, but that’s as far down the sports road as I plan to go).

We’ve been on the team, a part of the committee, in the cast. We’ve experienced groups working well and succeeding. We’ve experienced groups clashing painfully and failing.

What’s the difference? How does a cast go from a cast to an all-star cast?

I am not sure it always comes down to the composition of the group. Frankly, I think that’s lazy thinking and lazy leading. I’ve ever been wary of the leaders who come newly into a situation and say “when I get my people in place, things are really going to work.” What about making things work with the people already there, with the cast already on its marks?

I believe good leaders work with casts to take them from being different individuals vying for the spotlight and shouting their lines over one another to being casts that work together, supporting each other and moving towards a standing ovation.

Is the metaphor too strained? How about this, then: I believe good leaders put people in positions for success, places where that play to strengths and deemphasize weakness. I believe good leaders structure the roles, responsibilities and tasks of their committees, advisory groups, departments and tasks forces cognizant of the makeup of the groups and understanding that one of the primary roles of the leader is to help people succeed. I believe good leaders create organizations of people within their communities who work together not only because they have to but sometimes because they want to.

In order to do this, good leaders know their people; they know their makeup and their personalities. They understand their strengths and their weaknesses. They’ve taken the time to communicate, to meet and talk and learn.

They know their actresses and actors.

Good leaders know how to assemble people into all-star casts.

Would Centennial have been as good without Robert Conrad’s Pasquinel or Richard Chamberlain’s McKeag? I think we all know the answer to that question.

Teach & Serve No. 16 – The Networked Reality

Teach & Serve 

No. 16 * November 17, 2015


Related Content from And There Came A Day:


THE NETWORKED REALITY

We are not encumbered by any walls, much less the four walls of our schools…

In the course of my work, I have the opportunity to spend time with large groups of educators who periodically come together for cohort meetings at locations across the country. The organization for which I serve helps put these events on for professionals in our network to bring them together so they can share with one another, learn from one another and simply be together with one another. In Chicago, Illinois last week, I was with over 65 principals from schools in our network. This week, the technology directors and folks with similar jobs in our schools will be gathering in Omaha, Nebraska.

As a participant in prior gatherings like this, I found them to be engaging and refreshing – chances to be with like-minded people discussing topics of the day that could make a difference in the lives of students back at my school. As a coordinator of said events, it’s very interesting to stand back and watch these gatherings unfold. Because the conferences in our network feature folks from a maximum of 90 schools, the people who come to them frequently know one another. Certainly they are familiar with each other’s schools. They have a shared bond beyond the jobs they do, so settling in and getting comfortable with each other doesn’t take very long and then the gatherings can really take off.

What I’ve found most intriguing (and, some might say, most obvious given that what I am about to write isn’t any great insight) is how connected these people remain between our periodic get-togethers. Though most of the schools in our network are spread across North America with miles-and-miles in between them, these people have been in contact in “off” years. They’ve been collaborating and working together, advising one another and staying abreast of developments in each other’s schools.

NetworkThe reality of our work today is that we are not encumbered by the “four walls” of our schools. We can be connected to wherever we’d like, whenever we’d like to be. We can reach out for expertise beyond ourselves, find wisdom in other contexts, look to people who are not us to tell us who we are and who we can be.

This is not just something we ought to do for fun. This is not just some opportunity we might consider taking advantage of when everything else at our school is going well and in place. This is not simply an option in the 21st century. It’s an imperative.

The reality of being able to be networked with other educators around our cities, our states, our country and our world is a reality that matters. It matters to our students, for their worlds are not our worlds. Their worlds are not the worlds in which we grew up or in which we learned to teach. Their worlds are interconnected and immediate. And we have to push into those worlds with force.

The networked reality calls us to do this. We don’t need to wait to read monthly journal articles about best practices being implemented in inventive schools half a country away from us. We can be connected to that progress, right here, right now in real time. We can bring experts to us. We can be experts for one another. The networked reality challenges us to be current, to build online Professional Learning Networks and to access them. To follow trends on Twitter. To fill our news feed with articles to parse, stories to read, strategies to attempt. The network reality makes our professional world so much larger while simultaneously rendering it so small we can grasp it, access it and use it to the benefit of our students.

After all, isn’t that what we’re all about? Aren’t we about benefitting the kids? The best way to do that, in real time, is to get comfortable in the networked reality.

Get comfortable in it and get to work.