Superheroic Leadership Vol. 1 No. 3 – All the World’s Waiting for You

Superheroic Leadership Vol. I * No. 3

All the World’s Waiting for You

Superheroic Leadership is a light-hearted examination of what superheroic figures have to teach about leadership and what I have learned from their adventures.


It is very difficult to remember that, before Wonder Woman was released this past summer, the movie was considered something of a gamble. I will not delve too deeply into the sociological impacts of these concerns, but they were clearly related to the fact that films starring women in lead roles and films directed by women simply do not draw wide audiences. Add to this the fact that superhero movies have been specifically designed to feature men and one can understand that concerns.

They were for naught.

Wonder Woman became the hit of the summer, grossing more than any other film and becoming one of the biggest hits Warner Bros has ever had.

Very cool.

But let us not lose the thread here: the character has an over 75 year publishing history, is one of the most recognizable characters in the world and, most importantly, stands for something.

Wonder Woman’s roots are in peace. She is a character designed to bring peace. And, as imagined in the movie, she also brings joy.

This was an amazing film. It presented a character – a woman – who is powerful, intelligent and strong. She is the driving force of the movie and she is devastated by her perception that humanity does not want to be better, to be joyful, to be peaceful. She is terrified by the idea that people wallow in their situations without being thankful, without being grateful, without being joyful.

And, when she is about to turn away from that society, when she is faced with the reality, she chooses instead to overcome her preconceptions and to fight for justice and peace.

What is amazing about this is that, in the hands of a lesser director than Patty Jenkins and a lesser actor than Gal Gadot, this could all seem naïve and silly.

It does not.

Wonder Woman stands as a reminder that we can see the world in a positive light. We can look up to strong, confident women. We can strive for peace.

What an inspiring message to this world at this time.

And, if you want to smile, give the below a listen!

Superheroic Leadership Vol. 1 No. 1 – Superheroic Leadership

Superheroic Leadership Vol. I * No. I

Superheroic Leadership

Superheroic Leadership is a light-hearted examination of what superheroic figures have to teach about leadership and what I have learned from their adventures.


For as far back as my memory will take me, superheroes have been a part of the life of my imagination. I learned to read from the adventures of Batman and Spider-Man, learned to take flights of fancy with Wonder Woman and the Avengers and so many more.  And it was not just the four-color heroes I read about in the pages of comic books that were alive in my mind. The heroes of science fiction, especially characters from Star Trek and Star Wars, shared almost equal time.

Growing up in the 1970s and 1980s, I found that affection for comic books and science fiction was less cool than playing sports or collecting baseball cards and I, like many others who shared these hobbies, did not exactly broadcast my affinity for them. I know I am not alone in that feeling.

How could those of us who spoke the secret language of comics, who knew the difference between the Empire and the Klingon Empire and who debated whether Superman could lift Thor’s hammer have possibly known that these characters we embraced as kids would become culturally dominant icons? How could we have anticipated The Avengers, The Dark Knight Trilogy, The Guardians of the Galaxy and Wonder Woman?

How could we have known the power these stories would have to captivate, to entertain and, dare I write, to inspire?

For there must be something inspirational about these characters and their stories. There must be something worth watching. There must be something with depth about which to think.

I believe there is and, while there are many reasons for the enduring popularity of superheroes and science fiction characters, I believe their lasting resonance has something to do with leadership.

Superheroic Leadership is, at least in title, an homage to Chris Lowney’s terrific Heroic Leadership, wherein Lowney juxtaposes lessons about leadership in business with the lives of early Jesuits. It is a clever and instructive book, Lowney’s Heroic Leadership, and one I highly recommend.

This every-other-week series of posts will not be as clever or instructive. What it will be is a light-hearted examination of what superheroic figures have to teach about leadership and what I, perhaps only on reflection, have learned from their adventures.

There must be a reason I have spent so much time and money on and with these characters, right?

Welcome to Superheroic Leadership!